Maisie Williams Talks Arya Stark with Rolling Stone

Maisie Williams recently sat down for a Q&A session with Rolling Stone where she discusses portraying Arya Stark and how she handles working with such challenging material.

maisie-600-1367427375Arya‘s been exposed to so much violence that of course she would look at it that way. When you want something done, you just do it.

It’s changed her, especially being at Harrenhal [the Lannister stronghold/torture prison from Season Two] and seeing all that. She realizes that even if she’s fair about things, the rest of the world isn’t. If she wants something done, she’s going to have to do it herself. That’s the way everybody works, so she’s going to have to match them. Otherwise, she’s going to fall behind.

She obviously has family on her mind in this episode. But when she tells Gendry “I can be your family,” it sounds like she might mean something very different – even if she herself barely realizes it yet.

When I first read that scene, it really got to me. I always knew that Arya and Gendry were going to take separate paths, but when you actually see it. . . I was really getting on well with Joe [Dempsie], and it was just like “Oh, this is going to end now.” Then you go in do it. At first I read it as “You can come to Winterfell, I’ll show you how everything goes, and you can come and sit at the table with us.” I thought it would be a bit like Theon. But when I was doing the scene, [director] Alex Graves said “When you say that last line, ‘I can be your family,’ say it like ‘I love you.'” And that’s the take that they used. On the day, we didn’t cut in between. We kept going, and going, and going again, which I really liked; otherwise, you get out of it and you have to try and build yourself back up to that point again. Sometimes I was really crying, and then we’d pull it back. I don’t know how many we did, but the last one we did…We settled on the one when I said it like “I love you,” and it really works.

I’m glad you brought up her Stark upbringing, because in this episode, she makes her most direct reference yet to her father. When you take it out of context, “Could you bring back a man without a head?” sounds grotesque or even absurd. But when you hear her say it, the need for her dad in her voice is so strong, it takes your breath away.

I know. You see this vulnerable side to her. Putting myself – someone my age – in that scene, I’m watching all of the scars that [Beric Dondarrion] shows her, all these different injuries that he’s had, and she realizes that there’s nothing actually missing. He didn’t lose an arm or anything – it’s just cuts and stuff. She thinks, “Well, maybe that isn’t possible, because…I don’t know if the head goes back on, or…” But she has to ask the question. It’s a bit of an. . . I don’t know. I don’t want to say an immature question, but she half doesn’t believe it, really. She knows that you can’t, she understands that, but it’s that vulnerable side, you know? “Is it possible to do that?” She doesn’t really think you can. You see a younger side to her then, and how much pain she’s in.

I’m glad you brought up her Stark upbringing, because in this episode, she makes her most direct reference yet to her father. When you take it out of context, “Could you bring back a man without a head?” sounds grotesque or even absurd. But when you hear her say it, the need for her dad in her voice is so strong, it takes your breath away.

I know. You see this vulnerable side to her. Putting myself – someone my age – in that scene, I’m watching all of the scars that [Beric Dondarrion] shows her, all these different injuries that he’s had, and she realizes that there’s nothing actually missing. He didn’t lose an arm or anything – it’s just cuts and stuff. She thinks, “Well, maybe that isn’t possible, because…I don’t know if the head goes back on, or…” But she has to ask the question. It’s a bit of an. . . I don’t know. I don’t want to say an immature question, but she half doesn’t believe it, really. She knows that you can’t, she understands that, but it’s that vulnerable side, you know? “Is it possible to do that?” She doesn’t really think you can. You see a younger side to her then, and how much pain she’s in.

Complete story can be found here.

Advertisements

Game of Thrones Season 3 – First Images!

The first set of images from season 3 are finally here!

daenerys s3

Look under the cut for more images. The complete set can be found over at WinterIsComing.net!

Continue reading

Video: Season 2 DVD Bonus Feature – Stark Children Beat Box To Theme Song

Check out this video of Maisie Williams (Arya), Sophie Turner (Sansa) and Isaac Hempstead-Wright (Bran) doing some improvisational beat-boxing to the Game of Thrones theme song!

Joe Dempsie Talks About Gendry

Maisie Williams (Arya) and Joe Dempsie (Gendry) are just trying to survive

 

The GoT cast has been touring about, promoting the show, and Joe Dempsie, the one who plays former King Robert Baratheon’s surviving bastard son Gendry, talks a little about his character.

Joe, as it turns out, actually has a much lighter color to his hair than the character he portrays on the show.

Gone too are the jet black locks that helped him look like the illegitimate son of the late King Robert Baratheon. Instead, Joe is sporting his natural color, a blond hue more befitting the Lannisters, the very family whose armies just made Gendry and Arya prisoners at Harrenhal.

“When I was cast, the character description was, ‘tall, muscular, with thick black hair.’ I was none of those three at that time,” he tells AccessHollywood.com’s Laura Saltman as he sits down for a chat. “I kind of thought, ‘I can die my hair and hit the gym, but I can’t do much about the shortness.’ So two out of three ain’t bad.

That wasn’t the only changes he’s had to make in regards to shaping Gendry:

“In terms of playing the character, though, I had to sort of do a lot of my own thinking and there wasn’t much information to go on about his past or anything that really shaped him into the person that he kind of is,” Joe continues. “So I just kind of wanted to make him a nice guy, who was a man of principle… more than anything.”

Joe also finds it quite interesting that he’s become such a popular character, so much that Gendry has been a trending Twitter topic:

He may not have physically resembled the part, but it’s easy to see why Joe was given the role of Gendry. In just a few scenes at the start of the Season 2, his performances – humorous, delightful and full of chemistry with co-star Maisie Williams (who plays Arya) – quickly made him a fan favorite. In recent weeks, #Gendry even became a top trending topic on Twitter, but the popularity of his character still came as a bit of a surprise.

“Oh yeah, definitely,” he says. “I think it’s strange, ‘cause he was quite a minor character in [Season] 1, but you definitely got the impression that there was more to come, that there was kind of something… like a deeper story to be told.”

He goes on to explain more of what Gendry knows and doesn’t know:

These days, on “Game of Thrones,” his first project for American audiences, Joe is once again playing a young person, and while his character, Gendry, is smart enough to know Arya is a girl in disguise, he hasn’t quite made the connection that King Robert was his father.

“He knows that there’s something up because obviously he knows that Jon Arryn came to see him, as Hand of the King and then Ned Stark, and the same thing happened [to them]. And now, knowing he’s kind of a wanted man, it is kind of strange that he’s not asked anyone. I have to admit,” Joe notes of his character. “But I think his world has been so far removed from anything that could even compare to being the son of the king… If he discovered his true parentage, I think he would be shocked, but… I think he would believe it.”

What does he think about what his character is having to go through and what he has to go through himself to make it all work?

For now, Joe’s character has other things to focus on instead of unlocking that mystery — like surviving. In Sunday’s episode, just before Gendry was about to undergo torture at the mouth of a rat fleeing a burning bucket, Tywin Lannister stepped in and told his troops to put the prisoners to work. According to Joe, for Gendry, that means making armor — and in true “Game of Thrones” fashion, some of that work will be shirtless.

“Yeah, there was a complete – I mean it was completely gratuitous. I obviously have no dignity,” he laughs, after a discussion of the “Saturday Night Live” “GOT” parody (he loved it) prompts the revelation he’s about to show off the work of many hours in the gym.

“But, yeah, I’m forging a sword. In the script it says he’s forging a sword in the baking heat. Belfast, [where the show is partially shot] in November, doesn’t really do baking heat. So I’m kind of like, forging a sword. Topless. In drizzle,” he adds.

And here’s what Joe has to say about the competitive spirit of his co-stars:

Knowing he had the scene coming up last year lead the actor to consuming “a lot of protein shakes” and into a bit of competition with some of his fellow cast mates.

“It got quite competitive on set — to the extent of complete body fascism on set,” he laughs. “Alfie Allen [Theon Greyjoy], Richard Madden [Robb Stark] – we were all trying to get in the best shape possible.”

“So who’s winning that war – who’s winning the best body on ‘Game of Thrones?’” Laura chimes in.

“You know what? I don’t know. I have not seen the stuff that they have shot. We don’t all really show each other,” he laughs. “I will have to wait and see.”

You can read the full article on AccessHollywood, where he talks about his work on other shows.

 

Stark Kids Sing Intro

If you haven’t gotten a chance to listen to this young’ns (which is on the DVD/Blu-Ray feature of Season 1), listen now.

This is Maisie Williams (Arya), Sophie Turner (Sansa), and Isaac Hempstead Wright (Bran) with their rendition of the show’s opening theme music.

Oh a side note, I wonder if their parents let them actually watch the show.

Character Summary – Arya Stark

Image by sykaaa

We continue with Day 8 of our Character Summary countdown with Arya Stark.

Arya is the third child of Eddard and Catelyn Stark, and she’s also the youngest daughter. She is a very feisty young girl, who does not really share the interests of being a “lady” in the court. Her half brother, Jon Snow, gives her a sword as a gift to her before he leaves for The Wall. Upon knowing that all great swords have names, she names her sword “Needle.”

 

 

 

 

Image by Daenerys-m0d

One day, Arya is practicing with a peasant friend, Mycah when Prince Joffrey and Sansa come across them.  Joffrey’s taunts leads to an altercation and soon Arya’s direwolf, Nymeria, attacks Joffrey.  Arya chases off Nymeria to save her from death, but Sansa’s direwolf, Lady is killed in Nymeria’s place.  Also, Arya’s friend, Mycah, who was accused of attacking Joffrey is killed by the Hound, Sandor Clegane.  Arya harbors a lasting enmity for the Lannisters and Clegane because of those incidents (quite frankly, understandable).

Arya later reveals to Eddard that she has a sword, and at first is hesitant for her to use bit, but soon changes his mind and hires a swordsman to train her, calling them her “dance lessons.” She learns quite a bit from Ferol.

Unfortunately, during the purge of the Stark loyalists, Arya is forced to escape and Ferol is killed.  She ends up killing a stable boy who tries to take her sword.  Her first kill.

Arya hides within the city, living on the streets, until the day of her father’s execution.  She witnesses her father’s fealty plea, but is kept from witnessing his execution.  A man named Yoren of the Night’s Watch shields her from that sight and takes her away.

Yoren begins the process of treating her as a boy as her true identity will have to be kept secret to keep her safe.  Yoren takes her and other recruits to The Wall, with her new name as Arry.

Image by dodongo-fin

Arya is played by Maisie Williams.  It seems this is her only acting credit and for that, she does brilliantly.  I’m excited to see how things progress with her character in the second season. Will she see her half-brother, Jon Snow again?  Will she see any of her family?  So far, Maisie has done well and I’m looking forward to seeing how she will handle her characters new developments.

 

Game of Thrones Season 1: Episode 3 – ‘Lord Snow’

So far we’ve given you recaps of Episodes 1 and 2 from Season 1 as we prepare for the start of Season 2. Today, we add another Game of Thrones episode review, provided by our allies at Picktainment.com

Below is an excerpt from the Season 1, Episode 3 review by thefandom.net’s owen Adam Spunberg. These were written immediately after the episodes aired, so you might enjoy the fresh perspective. You can read the FULL REVIEW by clicking HERE!

Picking up right where The Kingsroad (Episode 2) left off, Ned Stark is now at King’s Landing, Jon Snow is training for the Night’s Watch, and the Targaryens continue to move west with their Dothraki horsemen. These three main plot lines are weaved in and out artistically like a Bosch triptych, paced perfectly and transitioned with superlative skill. Because all three focal points are equally enthralling, the suspense roars in triple; the viewer desperately wants to know what will happen in one story arc, but does not mind shifting to another where the same eager feeling pervaded before. To make an analogy, it would be as if a reader pulled out his/her three favorite books and read them at the same time, shuffling from one to the next without disappointment. Thrones has been just THAT good!

There is plenty of scheming going on, with most characters embodying a lighter or shadier color on a gray spectrum, but one heroine has emerged as angelically white as Kate Middleton in a wedding dress: Arya Stark (Maisie Williams). The little, tomboyish daughter represents all of Ned Stark’s best qualities, with a little extra fire and grit. Think of a softer Mattie Ross from True Grit, with a profound understanding of the decaying world around her, and yet she also displays youthful exuberance and a great love for all things good. She does not just fight for good: she is goodness personified, capable of standing up to a sniveling prince and jumping into the arms of her loving, bastard half-brother. She can fight with a sword and make it seem like a “dance,” and then smile like a child who stumbles upon something magical. A wonder to behold, her character is developed in extraordinary fashion.

And then we have Daenerys Targaryen (played by Emilia Clarke), the silver-haired beauty who is now discovering the perks of her ill-begotten marriage. Her despicable brother may have forced her to wed the leader of the Dothraki, but she is finally finding her inner voice. We still don’t know what will come of her newfound influence, but her transformation from meek, emotionless subservient to I-am-worth-something force is beautiful to observe. Winter is coming, but Daenerys warms herself to Thrones fans every scene.

Lastly, we have Jon Snow (Kit Harington) in his plight to discover himself north of the wall, assisted by the ever-so-likable dwarf, Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage). Over the course of his career, Dinklage has played a number of intriguing characters (The Station Agent, for one), but he has really come into his own as the sharp-witted Lannister runt, scheming at something genius.

To read the full review at Picktainment.com, go HERE!